Biomedical Engineer, Medical Student, Lincoln Democrat
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Okay, How Many Kids Does Elon Musk Actually Have?

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Last week, we reported that Elon Musk has 11 children, which seemed like a lot at the time. Unfortunately, that number appears to be incorrect. In fact, he has yet another previously unreported kid, according to a report published Friday by Bloomberg. The total number of kids (that we know of) now appears to be 12.

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satadru
1 day ago
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The highlight here is that there are going to be a ton of claims on his estate...
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Kubo Studio Laika Will Bring Susanna Clarke's Piranesi to Stop-Motion Life

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In 2020, English author Susanna Clarke published her second-ever novel, Piranesi. Given that it’d been over 15 years since her Hugo Award-winning debut Jonathan Strange & Mr. Morrell, the book’s arrival had been a big deal at the time—and like how Strange was later adapted to TV, Piranesi is coming to film.

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satadru
1 day ago
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How? Also, this is exciting!
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Gilead's Twice-Yearly Shot to Prevent HIV Succeeds in Late-Stage Trial

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An anonymous reader shared this report from CNBC: Gilead's experimental twice-yearly medicine to prevent HIV was 100% effective in a late-stage trial, the company said Thursday. None of the roughly 2,000 women in the trial who received the lenacapavir shot had contracted HIV by an interim analysis, prompting the independent data monitoring committee to recommend Gilead unblind the Phase 3 trial and offer the treatment to everyone in the study. Other participants had received standard daily pills. The company expects to share more data by early next year, the article adds, and if its results are positive, the company could bring its drug to the market as soon as late 2025. (By Fridayt the company's stock price had risen nearly 12%.) There's already other HIV-preventing options, the article points out, but they're taken by "only a little more than one-third of people in the U.S. who could benefit...according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention." Part of the problem? "Daily pills dominate the market, but drugmakers are now focusing on developing longer-acting shots... Health policymakers and advocates hope longer-acting options could reach people who can't or don't want to take a daily pill and better prevent the spread of a virus that caused about 1 million new infections globally in 2022."

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satadru
1 day ago
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Obviously this is huge, but pricing for this is going to be insane, as the depot shot pricing already is for related shots...

And obviously pricing is a huge barrier to rolling this out, which isn't great for the sort of universal rollout that can work against resistance against these drugs growing in the population.
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Walmart Announces Electronic Shelf Labels They Can Change Remotely

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Walmart "became the latest retailer to announce it's replacing the price stickers in its aisles with electronic shelf labels," reports NPR. "The new labels allow employees to change prices as often as every ten seconds." "If it's hot outside, we can raise the price of water and ice cream. If there's something that's close to the expiration date, we can lower the price — that's the good news," said Phil Lempert, a grocery industry analyst... The ability to easily change prices wasn't mentioned in Walmart's announcement that 2,300 stores will have the digitized shelf labels by 2026. Daniela Boscan, who participated in Walmart's pilot of the labels in Texas, said the label's key benefits are "increased productivity and reduced walking time," plus quicker restocking of shelves... As higher wages make labor more expensive, retailers big and small can benefit from the increased productivity that digitized shelf labels enable, said Santiago Gallino, a professor specializing in retail management at the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School. "The bottom line, at least when I talk to retailers, is the calculation of the amount of labor that they're going to save by incorporating this. And in that sense, I don't think that this is something that only large corporations like Walmart or Target can benefit from," Gallino said. "I think that smaller chains can also see the potential benefit of it." Indeed, Walmart's announcement calls the tech "a win" for both customers and their workers, arguing that updating prices with a mobile app means "reducing the need to walk around the store to change paper tags by hand and giving us more time to support customers in the store." Professor Gallino tells NPR he doesn't think Walmart will suddenly change prices — though he does think Walmart will use it to keep their offline and online prices identical. The article also points out you can already find electronic shelf labels at other major grocers inlcuding Amazon Fresh stores and Whole Foods — and that digitized shelf labels "are even more common in stores across Europe." Another feature of electronic shelf labels is their product descriptions. [Grocery analyst] Lempert notes that barcodes on the new labels can provide useful details other than the price. "They can actually be used where you take your mobile device and you scan it and it can give you more information about the product — whether it's the sourcing of the product, whether it's gluten free, whether it's keto friendly. That's really the promise of what these shelf tags can do," Lempert said. Thanks to long-time Slashdot reader loveandpeace for sharing the article.

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satadru
1 day ago
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Hooray for dynamic pricing reducing menu costs... But when does pricing change based upon who is in front of the price label or who is in the store?

The opportunities for discriminatory pricing are just sitting there, and probably need legislation to be prevented.
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Recent movies and TV

jwz
1 Comment and 2 Shares
  • Poor Things (2023):
    This movie looked at the weirdest stuff Ken Russell had ever done and said "hold my beer". It's absolutely incredible. Full of relentlessly weird choices in acting, sets and especially cinematography. Why is it suddenly fish-eye! We will never know! And surprisingly filthy! How did this win Academy Awards? This movie is the kind of thing that the Academy hates.

  • The Abominable Dr. Phibes (1971):
    This movie is absolutely amazing. It had been so long since I saw it that I had forgotten it almost entirely. I remembered the murders, the mask, the hapless detectives, but what I forgot was the sets, the dancing, the fashion, the clockwork orchestra, the absolute lunacy! This is a movie made in 1972 and set in the mid-20s, so the look of it is this insane mixture of 60s high fashion and Art Nouveau. Every scene-change comes with a costume change. Every murder comes with a little dance from Phibes and Vulnavia. This movie is an absolute treasure.

  • Dr. Phibes Rises Again (1972):
    This movie is... lesser. It still has amazing sets, and costumes, and the dancing, but it also has an antagonist, and a smidge more plot. And that does not work in its favor. With the first one, you could just let the mood of it wash over you. This one leads you to ask questions like, "But how did he ship the clockwork orchestra to the pyramid?" and if you are asking questions like that, you have fallen out of the trance.

  • Lisa Frankenstein (2024):
    A goth girl and her reanimated corpse boyfriend. This is basically: "What if Edward Scissorhands was actually good?" It's set in the version of the 80s that is what people who weren't alive in the 80s think they 80s must have been like. (And even with that, I am embarrassed to admit that I didn't get the joke in the title until the next day. "Ohhhhhh....")

    In terms of set dressing and fashion, I wonder if people who lived through the 1980s feel about this movie the way that people who lived through the 1920s felt about Dr. Phibes.

  • 30 Coins (2020):
    This show is absolutely wild. There's a small town in Spain, a creepy priest, and some Satanists trying to collect the Judas McGuffins, and you think, ok, standard Catholic pea-soup fare, I know how this is all going to go. And then there are giant babies, spider monsters, mirror people, shoggoths. Every episode has a "what the fuck did I just see" moment. It's fantastic. And that's just like, the first four episodes! The S02 finale was just chef's kiss. I hope there will be a third season.

  • Giri Haji (2019):
    Japanese cop's dead brother was a mobster, and then shows up in London murdering people, so both the cops and the yakuza send him there to bring him back. Ass kicking ensues. It's mostly set in London, but about 1/3 in Japanese. I liked it a lot, despite my aversion to cop fare.

  • Death and Other Details (2024):
    Locked-room murder mystery on a cruise ship. It is fantastic, in the manner of Knives Out.

  • Parallel (2024):
    A neat little the-multiverse-sucks story where the spooky woods are a portal. Low budget but well done.

  • Extraordinary (2023):
    In a world where everyone gets a superpower at around age 18. Except it's usually a really lame, mostly useless power. This is very funny, in that very specific, cringey British TV way.

  • Ghosts (2019):
    A couple inherit a haunted house, and only one of them can see them. Extreme British Cringe. It took a couple episodes for it to grow on me, but it did.

  • Dune 2 (2024):
    Since part 1 wasn't really a movie -- it was the first two acts of a movie -- I was kind of reserving judgement on the whole thing until this came out. Part 2 is better, and as a whole, I guess it holds up pretty well. I enjoyed how they leaned in to the whole Bene Gesserit colonial thing: that the Fremen's religious beliefs had been done to them intentionally. Paul's character was certainly less flat than he was in the book. I still contend that nobody who hadn't read the books would have a god damned idea of what was going on.

  • Stopmotion (2024):
    Stop motion animators have a reputation for being complete weirdos to begin with, but when they try to work out their shit by going full Brothers Quay with roadkill... antics ensue. Anyway, this is creepy.

  • 3 Body Problem (2024):
    I tried to watch the 90 episode Chinese version and only made it to like episode three before I ran entirely out of fucks. When I heard that this version was by the Lost people I thought "Oh god no" but at least since this show only gave them eight episodes to make something of themselves, they showed some restraint. This wasn't entirely awful, but out of the gigantic cast there are only like two people to give a shit about. The Giant Cheesegrater scene was an amazing effect, but it defies any kind of sanity that it was the first tool in the box that someone would reach for.

  • Late Night with the Devil (2024):
    A 70s late-night host invites a possessed girl on for an interview. "What happens next might surprise you." This is pretty great. Even though it's mostly shot faux-documentary style, they don't go all shaky-cam.

  • Fallout (2024):
    Hyper-competent Mary-Sue has to go on a quest to find her missing dad, Kyle McGuffin. I'm led to believe that this was based on a video game. It certainly has video game logic and physics throughout. The sets are gorgeous, several of the characters are interesting, and much scenery is chewed. It bogged down in the middle and could have been shorter by 50%, but it was fun popcorn.

  • Night Shift (2024):
    Spooky goings-on at a mostly-empty motel, chock full of Checkhov's Handguns. It starts off seeming like it will be predictable but it has a good twist and a satisfying ending.

  • Rebel Moon 2, Something Something Subtitle (2024):
    I had some not-entirely-negative things to say about the first one but WOW is this a snore. While the first one at least took a tour of some goofy space-locales, this one had a 30 minute montage of harvesting wheat. Wheat. This was a major plot point. Because when you have FTL, antigravity, resurrection machines, and a Star Destroyer, apparently the Empire can't function without flying to another planet and bullying a village of literally 50 people into harvesting wheat by hand. Sure that scales. That scales.

  • Humane (2024):
    The solution to climate change is paying people to commit suicide. At the worst family dinner party, antics ensue. Between this and Antiviral, I'm starting to think that growing up in the Cronenberg household must have been pretty fucked up.

  • Godzilla Minus One (2023):
    I enjoyed this a lot; like the original, it was mostly about trauma rather than a rampaging lizard, though the lizard scenes were outstanding. My criticisms are: it could easily have been 25% shorter (the last third is mostly crying) and even though the sets, costumes and framing were excellent, every single shot was god damned teal and orange. No other colors exist in this universe. I'm told that the black-and-white edit is better, and that is utterly believable. If you haven't seen this yet, pick that version.

  • The Ministry of Ungentlemanly Warfare (2024):
    This is great. It's basically Inglorious Basterds but funnier and without Tarantino's weird tics. You wanna see a feel-good romp about some Nazis getting fucked up? Oh yeah you do. How does Alan Ritchson just keep getting larger? (Watch Blood Drive!)

  • Ghostbusters, Frozen Empire (2024):
    It's cute and fun. It suffers from having too many characters and the writers wanting each of them to get their solo. A bunch of it doesn't make a lot of sense, but the sets and the spectacle did a good job of making me not think about it too hard. (Watch I Still See You.)

  • Abigail (2024):
    This starts off as a solid heist movie, adventure party having fake names and all, and then when it pivots to some locked-house vampire shit, it really kicks off. Loved it.

  • Baghead (2024):
    Extremely solid ghost story. Reminded me a bit of the also excellent Talk To Me.

  • True Detective, Night Country (2024):
    Jodie Foster investigates some murders in Alaska, which also wants to murder you, and every single person is a piece of shit. This was pretty great -- about as good as S01. (I didn't much like, and barely remember, S02 or S03.)

  • Whiteout (2009):
    After the latest season of True Detective I was in the mood for more stories where the antagonist is the weather. In this, there's a murder in Antarctica, the night before everyone is shipping out before winter-over. I still really like this movie. There are human villains, bad people making bad decisions, but the primary villain is the environment, which vehemently wants you dead, and it is done really well. This is based on a fantastic comic by Greg Rucka and Steve Lieber, which is better, but the movie is still solid.

    Fun fact! When I was 12 or 13 I thought I might grow up to be a comic book illustrator. Problem was, I went to high school with Steve Lieber, and when I saw how good he was at it I thought, "Yeah, this is not a realistic goal, maybe I should be a computer-toucher instead."

    Billy Porter was also in our class, but fortunately I didn't have any musical theatre ambitions for him to inadvertently quash.

  • Civil War (2024):
    Not bad. I had a bad feeling about this when all the press was this sniveling, centrist, both-sides-ism, "but it's not political!" nonsense. But actually -- it's not political. It's a road-trip character study of a handful of war photographers. The war itself is just set dressing.

  • The Fall Guy (2024):
    Oh no, a stunt man has to solve a murder. Ryan Gosling Ryan Goslings all over the place. Dumb fun.

  • New Life (2023):
    The trailer gives too much away, but it opens with: girl gets infected with a weird disease, goes on the run, and now people are trying to murder her. I liked it. Solid ending.

  • Love Lies Bleeding (2024):
    Extremely trashy 80s noir. People who liked Blood Simple also liked.

  • The Primevals (2023):
    Full Moon Features are still making movies (yes, the Subspecies and Puppet Master folks) and this movie has all the quality of writing and acting that you would expect from their 80s fare, which is to say, abysmal. But! It's a mixture of live action and stop animation and I don't mean a bunch of digital stuff, or a bunch of digital stuff trying to look like stop animation, it seems to be the real deal. They were aiming for Harryhausen but landed on Rankin-Bass, but still, it's charming in its own way.

  • Wipeout 2097 Soundtrack: Noclip Documentary (2024):
    If you are a Wipeout obsessive like me, you will enjoy this brief retrospective and interview with Cold Storage.

Previously.

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satadru
1 day ago
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Bookmarking, obviously...
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mkalus
8 days ago
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iPhone: 49.287476,-123.142136
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Mozilla is an advertising company now

jwz
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This seems completely normal and cool and not troublesome in any way.

Mozilla has acquired Anonym, a [blah blah blah] raise the bar for the advertising industry [blah blah blah] while delivering effective advertising solutions. [...]

Anonym was founded with two core beliefs: [blah blah blah] and second, that digital advertising is critical for the sustainability of free content, services and experiences. [...]

As we integrate Anonym into the Mozilla family, we are excited about the possibilities this partnership brings. While Anonym will continue to serve its customer base, together, we are poised to lead the industry toward a future where privacy and effective advertising go hand in hand, supporting a free and open internet.

Anonym was founded in 2022 by former Facebook executives Brad Smallwood and Graham Mudd. The company was backed by Griffin Gaming Partners, Norwest Venture Partners, Heracles Capital as well as a number of strategic individual investors.

Now hear me out, but What If...? browser development was in the hands of some kind of nonprofit organization?

Oh wait.

Previously, previously, previously, previously, previously.

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satadru
1 day ago
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Sigh...
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